“Are you ready?  Ready for the playoffs?”*

…Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen is — in a big way.  His “first love”*1, the Portland Trail Blazers, a team that he’s owned for the past 21 years,  has made it into the Playoffs, and no one is more excited than the owner.   One of the most devoted owners in the NBA, Paul Allen has always been his team’s biggest fan.   

Allen attends a majority of the Blazers games, bought the team’s game stadium twice and weighs in enthusiastically on every decision, often splurging on players and expenses.  He installed equipment aboard his ships that lets him watch Blazers games when he is away from home.  And when Allen was asked to give the commencement speech to the graduating class at WSU in 1999, he graciously agreed, but gave it long distance via satellite uplink, speaking to Washington graduates from the Portland Rose Garden Arena so he wouldn’t miss a Playoff game.

So his Trail Blazers’ entry this year into yet another Playoffs series is a thrill—still a major thrill— to a guy who has had more than a few thrilling moments in his lifetime.  Blazermania is back and no one is more caught up in the wave of excitement than the owner himself.

Current adventure, Trail Blazers. Past adventures?  This guy’s had a few.  Hopefully he’ll tell us more about all of them in his upcoming memoirs.  http://www.businessinsider.com/paul-allens-newest-venture-a-memoir-2009-3   Don’t hold back, Paul—we want to know EVERYTHING !!!!!🙂

In the meantime, here is a sampling of Paul Allen’s ideas about — Paul Allen, of course — from his statements to the press through the years.  So, here you go….Part Three of Paul Allen: In His Own Words:

The projects you have funded so far cover a wide range of fields. What are the criteria you look for?

“I ask myself: What are the great questions in science, the knowledge that we are just scratching the surface of?  The chance that we are going to pick up the phone and an alien is going to be on the other end is small, but it is certainly worth—on a modest scale, for me—seeing if we can enable some of that research.  There are these greenfield areas like the human brain, systems biology, ­understanding how cells work internally, and how the proteins interact inside the cell. That’s an area I’m thinking about. Then there are the global issues we have today: global warming, the environment, and disease. I don’t know that I could make a difference in theoretical physics; that’s basically a bunch of mathematical and theoretical geniuses at different places. I’m not sure how anyone could make them work any faster than they are.” http://discovermagazine.com/2007/apr/the-discover-interview-paul-allen/article_view?b_start:int=1&-C=
The Discover Interview, Evan Ratliff

On Advice to Young People
 
If you are starting any new venture, try to find people who share your
dreams with the same enthusiasm that you do and that can complement your
strengths and bolster your weaknesses.  Start with small but achievable
dreams and under the right circumstances, these small dreams can lead to
bigger ones. Remember that you have all of the open-mindedness,
fearlessness and enthusiasm of youth.  Believe in the possibility of success.
From Paul Allen’s WSU Speech to graduating class via satellite uplink from the Rose Garden Arena upon receiving the Distinguished Alumnus Award—1999

Quote from the paulallen.com website (years ago):
  “What is the best advice, business or otherwise, you’ve had and from whom?
The best advice I’ve received came many years ago from my father.  He told me that you should love whatever work you do, you should try to find something you truly enjoy.  And I’ve been lucky through the years that the work I’ve been involved with has been challenging and for the most part, fun.”

On Trying New Things:


 You have to find and appreciate the joy and beauty of the world.  And
many times that comes if you force yourself to try things that you
otherwise might be skeptical of beginning.  In my case I discovered
scuba diving, but any kind of adventure that takes you totally out of
your normal life and into a different environment or meeting different
people can be very rewarding. Also, if you force yourself to be more
adventurous, the more ideas and different types of people you will meet
and the richer your life will become intellectually and otherwise…….
 
 From Paul Allen’s WSU Speech to graduating class via satellite uplink from the Rose Garden Arena upon receiving the Distinguished Alumnus Award–1999
  http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/12439/
 

On His Childhood in Seattle:
 
From “Paul Allen Unplugged” Dec. 2003 Columns UW Magazine
Tom Griffin
 While many of our alumni know of your generous contributions to the University, most don’t know of the UW connections going back to your childhood. Your father Ken Allen began his career with the University libraries in 1951, two years before you were born, and was Associate Director of the libraries from 1960-1982. Did your Dad open the resources of the UW  libraries to you when you were a child?
A. I spent many weekends in Suzzallo Library as I was growing up. I remember spending hours just combing through the stacks of musty books, including early books about computers. Books about science and aviation in particular were some of my favorites.
Did your family have season tickets to Husky games?
A. Yes, my father had season tickets for the Huskies for my whole childhood and I remember going to many Husky games with him. One of the reasons that I really wanted to have an open-air stadium for SeahawksStadium is that I have fond memories of wandering around Husky Stadium with my Dad, eating hot dogs and being able to watch the Huskies play outdoors in the elements—I think it’s one of the best parts about football!
Do you recall attending any open houses or science fairs at the UW that might have sparked your interest in computers?
I went to science fairs many times and had a lot of fun. More than anything it enhanced my love of science— and I carry that excitement with me today. I am particularly interested in how the brain works, and what we might be able to learn by looking at the role of the human genome in the function and anatomy of the brain. 

On His Eclectic Interests

“Allen says his business success is partly a result of his wide range of interests, which he thinks allows him to see connections between disparate areas that others may miss. His credits his parents, who gave him an open-minded start, dragging  Paul and his sister Jody to galleries, the opera, science museums, dance concerts and aviation exhibits. “Even as a kid, every year I was interested in something different,” Allen says, “whether it was chemistry or cards or physics or electronics or space travel or music.”    (Over the Horizon with Paul Allen: Another Microsoft Billionaire Speaks. Fortune: 7/11/1994 by David Kirkpatrick.)

On  SETI

From The Discover Interview with Paul Allen (by Evan Ratliff )   http://discovermagazine.com/2007/apr/the-discover-interview-paul-allen
What do you think are the chances of SETI’s succeeding—in other words, of finding intelligent life beyond our world?
“The scientists are optimistic because they think that if they have better instruments that look deeper or on more frequencies, there should be civilizations out there broadcasting. I think everybody would admit it’s a long shot, but if that long shot comes in… wow.”
If they do get the signal, will you be the first person they call?
“Actually, first they call the White House. At one point they told me I was third or fourth on the list. So I guess that’s one of the benefits of funding the project. But the phone hasn’t rung yet.”
What would that kind of discovery mean to you?
“That would be such a life-changing thing, for us all to know that there are other beings out there who we could potentially communicate with, or maybe we are listening to a signal that they transmitted hundreds of millennia ago. And then we’d say, “Well, what was in the message? Can we decode the message, and can we communicate back? What are they really like? Are they oxygen-breathing bipeds, or are they a gas cloud on some gas-giant planet?”

On Music


 http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/emp/allen.shtml   Gene Stout Seattle P-I
June 22, 2000   The Visionary: Jimi Hendrix set off a spark in Paul Allen’s Imagination  (On Jimi Hendrix, music and the Experience Music Project Music Museum):
I think Jimi expressed in some of his interviews, and in his songs, the idea that music serves as a magic carpet that can take you to different places,” Allen says. “There’s a churchlike feeling there, and great music makes the spirit soar.”  …..

“………..”It was really a challenge to come up with things that were hands-on, yet robust enough to stand up to thousands of people using them and still allow a level of instruction for someone who hasn’t had much experience playing an instrument,” Allen says. 
“We just want to get them excited about music and think, ‘Hey, here’s a door I can go through.’ There’s a lot of fun and excitement in self-expression.” 

 


 On Football:


“Hail From the Chief” by Brian Davis from the Seahawks’ website:   http://www.seahawks.com/ardisplay.aspx?ID=1002
“My experience with football goes back to watching Husky games with my father when I was under the age of 10—outdoors, eating a hot dog and cracking open some peanuts and seeing a game played out in the elements. That’s real football to me, so that was my dream and I think we’re delivering on that.”

On Science Fiction and  the Science Fiction Museum


 http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=3203151
  “The Microsoft billionaire, whose personal collection inspired the idea for a museum, hopes the facility attracts droves of sci-fi fans from around the galaxy.
“I was exposed to science fiction at an early age,” Allen says. “I think… it’s actually about science and where science is going to take humanity and culture in the future.”

On The Allen Institute for Brain Science

From “Piece of Mind” The Economist  http://www.economist.com/theworldin/displayStory.cfm?story_id=12494720&d=2009 
   “The scientists used state-of-the-art technology to dissect a mouse brain, photographed it sliver section by section, then reassembled it in a computer database that would allow easy access. But it was the speed at which the project was accomplished and what they did with it afterwards that changed the game.
They released it to the public. Over the Internet. Free.
When we first put the mouse-brain atlas online free, it was met by the research world with suspicion. People wondered what the catch was. Scientific research has long been a solitary endeavour—one researcher, one microscope. Findings are protected so that discovery credit can be clearly defined and awarded. This is a successful model and will continue to be.
However, the Human Genome Project demonstrated a different path: multiple teams working collaboratively towards a common goal. I believe a real acceleration in progress and innovation comes from the open sharing of ideas and collaboration. We wanted the mouse atlas to be free and available for all to use as the basis for foundational research and discovery.
A new generation of implantable pacemakers for the brain will be widely used to treat everything from depression to addiction and Parkinson’s disease
If we thought it would be a hit right out of the gate, we were slightly wrong. It took a while for people to trust that it really was free to use. No one believed in a free lunch.
Now, things have changed. Today we have many scientists using the atlas for their research into Alzheimer’s, bipolar disorders, Down’s syndrome, Parkinson’s, fragile x mental retardation and epilepsy. The atlas is also giving scientists insight into alcoholism, obesity, sleep, hearing and memory.”

And from a recent Wired Article:

In March 2002, Paul Allen—co-founder of Microsoft and 41st-richest person in the world—brought together a dozen neuroscientists for a three-day meeting aboard his 300-foot yacht, Tatoosh, which was anchored in Nassau, Bahamas. At the time, Allen’s philanthropic work consisted of an eclectic (some say frivolous) set of endeavors. There was the Experience Music Project in Seattle, a rock-and-roll museum designed by Frank Gehry; the Allen Telescope Array, 350 radio telescopes dedicated to deep-space observation and the search for extraterrestrial life; and SpaceShipOne, the first privately funded plane developed to put a human in space. But Allen was eager to start something new: a project involving neuroscience. He was excited by the sheer uncharted mystery of the mind—one of the last, great scientific frontiers—hoping a single large-scale endeavor could transform the field.
“I first got interested in the brain through computers,” Allen says. “There’s a long history of artificial intelligence programs that try to mimic what the brain is doing, but they’ve all fallen short. Here’s this incredible computer, a really astonishing piece of engineering, and we have no idea how it works.”
Over several days, Allen asked the neuroscientists to imagine a way to move their field forward dramatically. “I wanted them to think big,” he says. “Like the Human Genome Project, only for the brain.”

http://www.wired.com/medtech/health/magazine/17-04/ff_brainatlas (Jonah Lehrer 3/23/09)

and from The Discover Interview: Paul Allen by Evan Ratliff  

http://discovermagazine.com/2007/apr/the-discover-interview-paul-allen/article_view?b_start:int=0&-C=
Your interest in the workings of the brain seems like a logical step for someone who started out writing software.
“Yeah, if you are involved in computers, at some point you end up being fascinated by the idea of the human brain. The human brain works in a completely different fashion from a computer and does some things so much better than a computer, and this may remain true for the next 100, 200 years. How can that be? So I brought a bunch of neuroscientists together and asked, “What can I do that would be interesting and different that would potentially help the field of neuroscience move forward?” The answer was a genetic database of the mouse brain.”

 
On Space Travel:


THE ROBERT J. COLLIER TROPHY 

Paul G. Allen
Remarks on Winning ‘The Robert J. Collier Trophy’
National Air and Space Museum
Washington, DC
April 19, 2005
from www.paulallen.com website

  “I feel I’ve been lucky to be part of three great waves of change—the personal computer, the Internet, and now private space travel.  All were extraordinary, but for sheer adrenaline, nothing will ever top that day last June when we first sent Mike Melvill to the edge of space in SpaceShipOne. 
I was always interested in flight and growing up in Seattle in the 1950s and ’60s was a great place to explore those interests. We had the World’s Fair, a strong local aeronautics industry, and I loved going to the library with my mother where I found books like Robert Heinlein’s “Rocketship Galileo,” or Willy Ley’s “Rockets, Missiles and Space Travel.” 
Science fiction was great back then, but it was amazing how much trouble it had keeping up with the reality of actual space travel. Like millions of American kids, I followed the Mercury suborbital flights, then Gemini, and then the Apollo lunar missions. I remember how exciting it was to watch those events on our grainy black and white TV set. Like many kids back then, I built scores of airplane and rocket models, and naturally, I had a plastic Air Force helmet with a flip-down visor. I even had hopes to become an astronaut one day. But after my 5th grade teacher realized I was sitting in the front row of class and squinting—it became apparent that I was nearsighted and I realized that becoming an astronaut was not in the cards for me. 
I have no doubt that these formative early experiences with space exploration helped fuel my desire to build and program computers. That same spirit of invention was always in the air in the early days of Microsoft. With SpaceShipOne, the work we did with Burt Rutan and his team at Scaled reminded me in many ways of the work Bill Gates and I were doing when we were just starting out. There aren’t that many times in your life you get to work on a project that is challenging, groundbreaking, and just plain fun.”

Recently on space travel, while watching friend Charles Simonyi blast off into space for a trip to the International Space Station:

“It’s fantastic to see a launch, but when it’s one of your friends it’s just something so special,”  Allen told Associated Press.   Allen said he would not be interested into getting into orbit using Russian technology, but is hoping to using his own spacecraft. He is a major investor in SpaceShipOne, the first commercial space operation.
http://www.vinunet.com/vinunet/news/2239325/simoni-sets-iss-space-tourist 
http://www.personalspaceflight.info/2009/03/27/paul-allen-future-space-tourist/     http://content.usatoday.com/topics/photo/People/Business,+Science+and+Technology+Figures/Paul+Allen/0dnL0857t8gym/4 )
 
 
 On SpaceShipOne:


” As an engineer, I’ve learned to avoid words like “awesome” or “amazing” that don’t describe things specifically; but I can’t think of any other way to describe Burt’s team and what they have achieved. With only 20-odd people, working out of a simple hangar in the Mojave Desert, they reinvented, for all time, the way we view space exploration—that we can accomplish it in new and cost-effective ways as private enterprise, and that soon it will be a possibility for a great many of us.

I’d also like to say a word about courage. Never in my career have I put my own life on the line to advance knowledge. Our pilots did just that. I can’t say enough to convey my thanks to Mike Melvill, Brian Binnie and their families for their commitment to SpaceShipOne. Without them, none of us would be here today. The early aircraft pioneer Otto Lilienthal once said, “To invent an airplane is nothing. To build one is something. To fly is everything.”…………………..
 
…………..But I hope SpaceShipOne does more than just bring people to the edge of space. I hope it helps to rekindle a passion for aviation, rocketry and exploration among kids. And I hope it motivates educators to lay the important foundation of making science and math really engaging to a new generation of students. ” (Collier speech as posted on paulallen.com)
 
On the Biggest Thrill: 


 “I feel I’ve been lucky to be part of three great waves of change—the personal computer, the Internet, and now private space travel. All were extraordinary, but for sheer adrenaline, nothing will ever top that day last June when we first sent Mike Melvill to the edge of space in SpaceShipOne.” (Collier)
 
On what he wants to be his legacy:

http://www.sportsbusinessradio.com/node/1423
 “You just try to create things or look for opportunities to do things for the world at large that are going to make the world a better place.”

 
On The Future:

 
 “I was always thinking about the future as a kid,” he says. “When you’re
a kid, you think anything is possible. You don’t know about constraints.”

  Living: Sunday, June 14, 1998  A Wealth Of Interests — The Big-Idea Billionaire — Paul Allen Is Into
Sports, Technology, Music, Real Estate, Movies – And He’s Not Done Yet”  by Richard Seven
  (He still does think anything is possible, or at least he seems to….)
 
 “From technology to science to music to art, I’m inspired by those who’ve blurred the boundaries, who’ve looked at the possibilities, and said, “What if…? 
 In my own work, I’ve tried to anticipate what’s coming over the horizon, to hasten its arrival, and to apply it to people’s lives in a meaningful way. Challenges inspire me, whether it’s pushing further into space than any private citizen ever has, as with SpaceShipOne or into the inner reaches of the human mind, as with the Allen Brain Atlas initiative. The varied possibilities of the universe have dazzled me since I was a child, and they continue to drive my work, my investments, and my philanthropy.”
 I hope you believe, as I do, in the inexhaustible ability of human beings to find answers to problems, to create works of beauty and originality, and to craft vital new ideas inspired by those who’ve gone before. The possible is constantly being redefined, and I care deeply about helping humanity move forward. “
(From Paul Allen’s website www.paulallen.com)
 And as he said a couple of years ago, in Paul Allen’s own words…..

 
  “I’m not near the end of the story.” 

 http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2005-01-17-paul-allen_x.htm  (Microsoft Co-founder’s Dreams Funded into Reality  by Allison Linn   1/17/05)
 
I can’t wait to hear more…..looking forward to hearing the rest of the story in your memoirs, Paul!!!!….🙂

______________________________________________

*From Jason Quick of the Oregonian: (http://blog.oregonlive.com/behindblazersbeat/2009/04/behind_the_blazers_locker_room_13.html)

“A scene that shows how fired up owner Paul Allen is: As the media was waiting to get inside the postgamelocker room, Allen emerged from his private suite. As he walked through the gauntlet of reporters he looked at me and smiled. “Are you ready? Ready for the playoffs?” And with that, he extended a fist for a fist-bump. I think it’s safe to say Paul is ready for the playoffs. And I think it’s safe to say Paul is glad he didn’t sell the team a couple of years ago. I still contend he is one of the best owners in sports.”

*1 http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2009076872_blazers18.html

What else would you like to know about Paul Allen? 

 
I can think of a million things that I’d like to know—questions that I’d love for him to answer in his upcoming autobiography.
 
Like, for example…
  • What has been the greatest source of happiness in your life?
  • What do you consider your greatest achievement(s)?
  • And, perhaps the biggest question of all:   Do you believe that money can buy happiness?
I’m just wondering,  because if anyone in the world could buy happiness, it would be you, Paul.
I’m not saying that money is all you have–in fact, it’s because of the other resources that you have that money hasn’t become a problem.
You’re not evil, for starters. You have integrity.   And so you are capable of using your resources for good, and of not being consumed by them due to personal vice.  You’re imaginative and brilliant, with wide-ranging interests and talents, you have a pioneer’s fearlessness and an artist’s sense of perfection.  The money is just one more resource, but it seems as if it makes the other qualities more impactful.  You use your money to make bigger footprints and to do great things—the sheer volume of what you can contribute makes that a given, right?
And so I imagine that you could answer this question from a really unique perspective. You once told me that you were happy.  So I guess my next question is  “Why?” Did the money hurt or help? Or does it make any difference at all?
 How would you answer the question: “Can money buy happiness?”
 

 Just wondering……🙂

 

In any case….here are a few more Paul Allen quotes that give a pretty decent portrait of the man—so onto Paul Allen: In his own words…..
————————————
 
On how a brush with death changed his life: 

 ALLEN’S INTERESTS WIDE-RANGING SEAHAWKS ANOTHER PIECE OF PUZZLE.(Sports)
Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Seattle, WA)
Date: 7/1/1997
Author: Wallace, James 

 The turning point in Allen’s once hard-driving life came in 1982, when he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease, a form of cancer. He underwent months of painful radiation and chemotherapy while trying to continue the demanding pace required at Microsoft. He could not. So he quit the company that he and Gates had founded in 1975. He later returned to serve on the board of directors.
“To be 30 years old and have that kind of shock – to face your mortality – really makes you feel like you should do some of the things that you haven’t done
,” Allen said in an interview with Fortune magazine two years ago on the occasion of Microsoft’s 20th birthday.
Allen’s cancer went into remission. It has not returned. But the illness changed his life.  

 

On Being Recognized in Public 

  

 I do get recognized when I go out in public sometimes, but it just depends on the time and place – and it never deters me from doing anything. It’s nice when people say “hi” or “thanks” – it helps me remember that I’m able to help the community in some way and that my charitable work is making a   difference for people.  

 

On Paul’s Father:

 

  

Paul Allen’s Thoughts Drift to His Father 

Steve Kelley 

 2/4/06 

Seattle Times  

 http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=kell04&date=20060204&query=whitsitt 

  

Part of the bond between Allen and his father developed while watching and playing games. Father and son rooting hard for the home team. Father and son playing catch in the street. 

“My dad had a real love of sports, and I feel sad that he’s not able to be here to share in the enjoyment of being here at the Super Bowl,” Allen said Friday afternoon, sitting in a small conference room on the 39th floor of the Renaissance Center.”You share all those sports moments  growing up. Then you’re in something like the Super Bowl, and unfortunately he can’t be there with you. That was true as well of being in the NBA Finals with the [Portland Trail] Blazers.” 

Kenneth Allen, who died in November 1983, taught his son how to throw a tight spiral. He took Paul to Washington games at Husky Stadium. They saw their first great sports spectacle together, the 1964 Rose Bowl, where Washington lost to Illinois, 17-7. 

For Kenneth and Paul Allen, sports were always there. The common language. The shared experience. Kenneth Allen would understand how difficult it was for Paul to get to this game. He would appreciate the heartbreaks and heartthrobs his son experienced since purchasing the Seahawks in 1997. 

“My dad was a pretty good high-school athlete,” Allen said. “He was a center on the football team in Oklahoma and a forward on the basketball team. I still have a picture of me wearing the leather helmet he wore when he played in high school. 

“I think he’d be happy that the team was able to get here. I just wish he’d gotten the chance to talk with Mike [Holmgren] and some of the players on the team and enjoy some of those kinds of things.” 

 

On Family
  

When you moved the company from Albuquerque, was there some consideration of moving to the Silicon Valley? Was the UW also a factor in coming back to Seattle?
Albuquerque was a great place, but I missed my family and missed living in the Northwest. I’m a Seattle native and my roots are deep here—Bill and I thought it was time to go home and see what we could accomplish in Seattle. Bill and I also thought that people in the Bay Area seemed to change jobs every 18 months, and we would have a more stable and focused workforce up in Seattle than if we moved to the Bay Area—and is was much easier to hire people and relocate them to Seattle than to Albuquerque.
Jumping ahead a few years, you left Microsoft in 1983 and took some time off. Sadly, your father died that same year. Just five years later, you decided to make what I believe is your first major philanthropic gift: $11.9 million to create the Kenneth S. Allen Endowment at the UW. Can you tell us how you got the idea for the gift?
My father had worked at UW as the associate director of libraries and obviously I had many great experiences on campus—from the library to the early computer experiences we talked about. My family wanted to give back to the University to help make sure that students for many generations to come have access to the tools they need—whether it’s an outstanding library or a great computer center or a top-notch arts center (the Faye Allen Center for the Visual Arts at the Henry) that can make a difference in their lives

 Paul Allen Unplugged Dec. 2003 Columns UW magazine
Tom Griffin  
http://www.washington.edu/alumni/columns/dec03/allen01.html 

 
 
On How to Make a Difference
 

Of course, not all challenges spring from technology.  Many of the
toughest problems we face today, hunger, the environment, population
growth and violence desperately need people who want to attack these
problems and make a difference in the lives of others.
In my experience, nothing is as rewarding as teamwork that results in
something that helps and benefits many people.
 

The same mindset of fearlessness, new thinking and passion applies at
least as much as in technology, and the personal rewards in these areas
can be just as great if not greater.
 

My mother’s passion, for example, was teaching elementary  school after
she was a librarian.  I have heard on many occasions how her former
students have expressed how she enriched and influenced their lives.
A legacy like this is just as essential to building our society as any
corporate success. 

From Paul Allen’s WSU Speech to graduating class via satellite uplink from the Rose Garden Arena upon receiving the Distinguished Alumnus Award—1999 
 
ON MICROSOFT 
Discover Magazine Interview   Evan Ratliff     4/23/07 

“When you and Gates started out, how ambitious were you?
We knew that microcomputers with software on them could have some impact, and certainly they were cheap. A big part of the success of Microsoft was that every year, the chips our software ran on got faster and cheaper. They doubled in capability every 18 months under Moore’s law. Even to this day, every year they get better and the price doesn’t change. It’s amazing, and that was a huge driver of our success. When we were starting Microsoft, we were thinking if we were really successful we would have something like 35 employees. On the other hand, in the back of our minds we were thinking, “Wow, if a lot of people bought a cheap computer . . . ” We had glimmerings of it.
How did the collaboration between the two of you work in those early days?
We split the programming tasks. I was familiar with the software that ran on mainframes and minicomputers that will let you emulate chips. And Bill bit off some of the really complicated stuff and did a great job architecting the overall design of the Basic program. Bill was always very focused on the external relationships and the business management part of it, whereas I was more attracted toward seeing where the leading edge of the technology was going. So we were a good complement to each other.
Do you guys reminisce about the old times?
Yes, we always have a laugh because it’s hard to explain the incredible level of fun we had. We talk about how Bill would sleep on the carpet at the office. The secretary would come in and see Bill’s feet sticking out of the door. We were very hard-core. Our only recreational activity was going to the movies. And then we would program until two, three, four in the morning and then get up fairly late, go back, and do it again. We just loved it. We had a great time.
In a weird way you and Gates still seem to follow parallel paths. Do you ever talk about entering a philanthropic collaboration?
We are always looking to find some areas of overlap in our philanthropic stuff. We’ve had so much success doing things before; it feels good. Recently we’ve been talking about doing something together on the frontiers of energy.” 

 

On Whether He Would have Done Anything Differently in the Early Days of Microsoft: 

 

Paul Allen Q & A 

 Q&A: Paul Allen reflects on early days at Microsoft, friendship with Gates
Friday, September 23, 2005  
By TODD BISHOP
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER  
 http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/241942_allenqa23.html 

  

 “Q: Is there anything that you would have done differently in the early days of the company? 

Allen: Not really. … We had a lot of fun back in those days. We worked tremendously long hours. Of course, Bill was going to Harvard, and I was working in Albuquerque. I kept trying to persuade him to leave school and was able to finally convince him that working at Microsoft was more important than going to Harvard, which it took his parents a long time to forgive me for, but I think they did in the end. 

 

On Microsoft’s Success: 

“We were in the right place at the right time. Certainly, we had dreams that we could start a successful company. But to look back and say in hindsight that we knew it would amount to all this—I don’t think that would be accurate.”   Inside Out: Microsoft—In our own words Sept. 2000 Microsoft 

 

On What Might Have Happened Had He Stayed at Microsoft: 

 

  http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/241942_allenqa23.html 

Q: Obviously, you left (Microsoft) under circumstances that were beyond your control. (Allen left his executive position with the company in 1983 as he battled Hodgkin’s disease.) Do you ever stop and think about what things would have been like had you remained? 

Allen: I don’t know if I would have been involved with sports teams and different kinds of philanthropy and other kinds of technology explorations if I had been at Microsoft, so my life took a dramatically different turn after I left. Obviously, if I had been at Microsoft, it would have been working on the same kinds of things. Would Microsoft products have been different with my contribution? We’ll never know the answer to that question, but certainly I feel like I’ve had a lot of fun, done a lot of exciting and different, unusual things, like SpaceShipOne, since I left Microsoft.”   Paul Allen Q&A: Paul Allen reflects on early days at Microsoft, friendship with Gates
Friday, September 23, 2005  
By TODD BISHOP
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER 

 
What else would you like to know about Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen?  Well, there’s more….stay tuned for Paul Allen: In His Own Words (Part Three)
PAUL ALLEN: IN HIS OWN WORDS 
 
Who is Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen?
 
Well, you’re about to find out.
 
This fascinatingly mysterious
Renaissance Man, who rarely gives interviews and comes out in public
only when he’s founded some new scientific or philanthropic venture, has decided to tell the story of his life in an upcoming memoir.  
 
See…
 
 
I can hardly wait!!!
 
Despite his reclusive reputation, Paul Allen has actually done a lot of
talking through the years, in speeches, in the smattering of interviews
he’s given to a lucky few, and in other public writings and appearances.  


And on those rare occasions throughout the past 30 years he’s given a pretty good glimpse of who he is,
expressing what he cares about, his hopes and dreams, his vision of the
future and even proffering a word of wisdom or two for future generations. 

  

So, here are some of the best of those speeches, quotes, interviews and
insights into Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen from the man himself: 

  

 
1970’s 
 
  
Local Boys Make Good 
Dec. 31, 1999 
 
Gates and Allen are seldom seen together in public, except at courtside during NBA games. But in 1995, to mark Microsoft’s 20th anniversary, they did sit for a copyright interview with Fortune magazine (which both read as kids). Over three hours, the two looked at what they had created and what they saw ahead.  
“By the time we got to Albuquerque to start Microsoft in 1975,” Gates recalled, “the notion was fairly clear to us that computers were going to be a big, big personal tool.”  
   
Allen added, “I remember having pizza at Shakey’s in Vancouver, Washington, in 1973, and talking about the fact that eventually everyone is going to be online and have access to newspapers and stuff and wouldn’t people be willing to pay for information on a computer terminal.” 
  
(Note for the record, that he said this in 1973!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
 
Inside Out: Microsoft—In our own words Sept. 2000 Microsoft 
  
“I expect the personal computer to become the kind of thing that people carry with them, a companion that takes notes, does accounting, gives reminders, handles a thousand personal tasks.”
Paul Allen January 1977 
 

 

1980’s 

 

1986 

  

From Todd Bishop’s former PI blog, here’s a retro of the article that appeared in the Seattle PI on March 14, 1986 when Microsoft went public: 

  

http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/microsoft/archives/102018.asp 

  

From the article: 

  

  

“Microsoft’s two founders – Bill Gates and Paul Allen – were made instant millionaires by the offering, but they didn’t seem fazed by all the hoopla. Allen went to work as usual at Asymetrix, the company he founded last year in Bellevue. Gates was in Australia on business.  

  

”I’m pretty happy,” said Allen. ”Everybody involved with Microsoft since the beginning has been looking forward to this day.”  

Allen said he might go out for some champagne to celebrate, but that the offering wouldn’t otherwise change his life.” 
 
(Well, maybe it did just a little….:-) 

 

Then began life after Microsoft. Allen started out with Asymetrix, making “software specifically designed for the new, more powerful 286 and 386 microprocessors.” Forbes, 4/6/1987 “The Next Chapter (Microsoft’s Paul Allen founds Asymetrix) by Edward F. Cone. 

From the article: 

  

“Microsoft has been phenomenally successful, which has been great for me,” says Allen. “Now we just want to have some fun and push back the existing boundaries of applications software.” 

 

 

1990’s 

 

 In 1993, few envisioned the enormous possibilities of the Internet, and yet Allen was already viewing the computer as an interactive multimedia device, a window to the “wired world.” One of his early “Wired World” investments was in Ticketmaster. 

  

See Seattle Times 11/23/93; Paul Andrews “Microsoft Co-founder Allen sees new first as ticket to interactive TV” 

  

From the article: 

  

“Allen, who helped jump-start the Information Age in 1975 through his development, with Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, of the BASIC software programming language for the first personal computer–has assembled an intriguing cast of investments potentially tied to a nationwide Data Highway. 

  

There are a number of areas in sports, music and entertainment where ticketing and related merchandise could be made available on an Information Superhighway,” Allen, 40, said in a telephone interview.  
 
Today that idea is commonplace—in the early 90’s it was downright prescient.

  

 

And check out this 1994 article from Computerworld “Paul Allen’s On-line Kingdom” 10/3/94 Stuart J. Johnston. 

  

What I call the “wired world” is a scenario where everybody is basically on-line via inexpensive, high-bandwidth digital channels into pretty much everybody’s home and place of business,” Allen said.  

 

 

 

 The marriage of video technology, computer technology, and networking is another sea change, where you try to ride the incredible wave that’s coming. That’s the core convergence of ideas for the information superhighway,” says Allen, gazing out of the giant picture windows and seeing the future. “So you say, ‘Okay, we’re getting a whole new medium here, what can we really do that people haven’t thought about in their individual areas?’ It’s not just showing movies on demand. What wholly new applications and user interfaces and products and services can you deliver?” 

“Over the Horizon with Paul Allen: Another Microsoft Billionaire Speaks.” Fortune: 7/11/1994 by David Kirkpatrick. 
 
 

So in 1995, Allen invested in yet another wired world venture, this time in Hollywood. See “Allen Shares Belief with Dreamworks” USA Today; 3/20/95; by Dottie Enrico.  

  

From the article: 

  

“I’ve been looking at ….investments in the entertainment business because I believe there’s going to be a melding of computer technology with entertainment content,” Allen told the Associated Press. 
 
(Today the “Wired World” is a veritable cornucopia of entertainment that is available to nearly anyone, anywhere at any time via computers.)
 
2000 to Today
 
 This vision is a passion that he continues to pursue even today.  Despite a few current market hurdles, Paul Allen’s ventures have now expanded into a wider variety of areas; everything from semantic web technologies to innovative alternative energy companies. Check out this site to learn more about Paul Allen’s current investments and creative ventures:
 
 
What else would you like to know about Paul Allen? 
Well, there’s lots more to come!  Stay tuned for Part Two: Paul Allen in His Own Words
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Businessman, Philanthropist and Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen wakes up today he will be 56 years old —– and a brand new U.S. President, Barack H. Obama, will begin his first day in office.

Fifty six years ago, on January 21, 1953, the day that Paul Allen was born in Seattle, Washington to Edna Faye and Kenneth Samuel Allen,  also marked the first day of a new Presidency—that of 34th U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower.  

On January 21st, 1953 the world was a much different place. Among other things, the U.S. experienced its leader’s inauguration in a very different way.  President Eisenhower’s Inaugural Address  was broadcast live—-just as it was yesterday—from the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.,  but his speech was received by the U.S. people only through radio, televison or newspaper.  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/dwighteisenhowerfirstinaugural.htm  

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=9600

 Fast forward 56 years later to 2009 and President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Address was viewed by millions; shot around the globe via a thousand different media. The Internet buzzed with the excitement of the moment—people “Twittered”  or “Tweeted” every line of the new President’s speech and about everything that was happening at the Capitol  http://search.twitter.com/search?q=Inauguration ; the Internet’s Hulu streamed the entire ceremony from beginning to end  http://www.hulu.com/spotlight/obamapresidency ; celebrities were sharing their private backstage views of the festivities surrounding the welcoming of a new President http://www.kyte.tv/ch/11105-johnlegendtv/321483-mobile-show-137  ; Satellite photos were taken http://www.foxnews.com/photoessay/0,4644,6338,00.html# and by the evening of January 20th, Microsoft had designed a composite 3D photo of the scene via “Photosynth” —resulting in a remarkable virtual tour of the event taken from the emailed cell phone and camera pictures of some of the 2 million people who witnessed the Inauguration firsthand.  http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-10146012-75.html

The same “Wired World” that Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen and numerous other Visionaries dreamed about years ago has come of age and has brought the Presidential Inaugural Experience up close and personal in a way never seen before—in a way that couldn’t have been imagined 56 years ago.  

The world is very different than it was in 1953.  And yet,  in some ways, it is also very much the same:

Fifty six years ago, our 34th U.S. President, Dwight D. Eisenhower, made his Inaugural speech on January 20, 1953 and reflected on our Country’s need for hope, for God’s guidance and help, and the courage to face the challenges of the day:

“The world and we have passed through the midway point of a century of continuing challenge…..in the swift rush of great events, we find ourselves groping to know that full sense and meaning of these times in which we live.   In our quest of understanding, we beseech God’s guidance.  We summon all our knowledge of the past and we scan all signs of the future.   We bring all out wit and our will to meet the question:
 
How far have we come in man’s long pilgrimage from darkness toward light?   Are we nearing the light—a day of freedom and peace for all mankind?  Or are the shadows of another night closing in upon us?”*1
 

And yesterday, January 20th, 2009,  so did America’s 44th President, Barack Hussein Obama.  As the American people face the enormous challenges of the day, we are still searching for an answer to the same question that was asked 56 years ago:

“How far have we come in man’s long pilgrimage from darkness toward light?   Are we nearing the light—a day of freedom and peace for all mankind?  Or are the shadows of another night closing in upon us?”

As Paul Allen celebrates his birthday today, this country welcomes a new President whose eloquent Inaugural speech brings hope that we are in fact drawing towards light and peace, and that despite the significant challenges we face today, we are better than ever before.  Here is the full transcript from yesterday’s address, courtesy of ABC News:

President Barack Obama Delivers Inaugural Address at US Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Jan. 20, 2009

 

“My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land – a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many.

They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America – they will be met. On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted – for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things – some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.

For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn. Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions – that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.

For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act – not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. And all this we will do.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions – who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them – that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works – whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public’s dollars will be held to account – to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day – because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control – and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our Gross Domestic Product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart – not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake. And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more.

Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort – even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect.

To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society’s ills on the West – know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us today, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages.

We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends – hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism – these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility – a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.

This is the source of our confidence – the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed – why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:

“Let it be told to the future world…that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive…that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].”

America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.”

—————————————————————-

Happy Birthday, Mr. Allen!

And Welcome Mr. President! May God bless and guide you and America!

 —————————————————

LINKS:

President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Speech:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RShdL1jB7-Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mrjl8puFROM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCFhpYMhaqY

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/Inauguration/story?id=6689022&page=1

President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Inaugural Address:

http://www.bartleby.com/124/pres54.html    

*1 Eisenhower Inaugural Speech
January 20, 1953

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/dwighteisenhowerfirstinaugural.htm

How to Go a Million Miles on Less than a Gallon of Gas

Oh, the weather outside is frightful….
And there’s no money to go anywhere even if you did dare to venture outdoors.
Sound familiar?
If you’ve got the Holiday blues, read on……maybe good cheer is just around the corner (or just around the world, if you think about it🙂. Cyberspace travel is free, and there are a million good destinations out there—plenty of things to see and do, plenty of fun to be had even if you never take a step out the door.
So let’s do some Holiday traveling, ok? 🙂

 

Before we even begin, let’s see where Santa Claus is right now!

 

http://www.noradsanta.org/en/home.html

 

 http://www.noradsanta.org/en/video.html

Check out the videos of where he’s been so far!! 

 

Now let’s take a tour of the wired world at Christmas time…..
Check out some Christmas Scenery (set to music):
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cY1otyfwu1o
 
Or a Christmas Lights Tour around the world:
 
http://www.tackylighttour.com/christmas_lights/bestchristmaslights.aspx
 
How about going to Paris?  Here is the Eiffel Tower via live web cam
http://www.paris-live.com/
And now on to a stunning live webcam view in Rome, Italy:
http://www.atlantestarhotel.com/webcam.htm
Here’s the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
http://www.earthcam.com/usa/dc/metrosquare/
and here’s London’s Trafalgar Square:
http://www.earthcam.com/uk/england/london/index.php?cam=2
Here are a few live webcams from Hawaii. First, a view of the sky from a telescope on one of the islands.
http://www.cfht.hawaii.edu/webcams/
An Hawaiian volcano
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cam/index.htm
And Waikiki beach
http://www.honolulu.gov/multimed/waikiki.asp
Google Maps Street View will give you amazing photos of just about anywhere you want to go, and you can travel along through neighboring streets when you get there. Try searching for the “Golden Gate bridge” in San Francisco,  the “North Pole” or your own house….
www.maps.google.com
But don’t get too close!🙂 LOLOL!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPgV6-gnQaE
 
Ready to head home? You’re just in time to finish a few belated Christmas cards. What about creating your own free ecards, complete with singing elves?
 
http://www.zefrank.com/xmas/
 
Now to hang out with friends……..
 
Go ahead and start the caroling at www.midomi.com.
 
Talk about what interests you in this virtual community www.twine.com, http://www.twine.com/twine/11p0rt184-14g/christmas or get a Facebook profile, and start chatting with friends from around the world. www.facebook.com.
 
And now to relax. Go ahead and start by lighting a fire in the fireplace.  I’ll wait:
 
www.blazinglogs.com
 
Grab a cup of hot chocolate:
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2g-FRSq7x_o&feature=related
 
http://www.virtualchocolate.com/chocolatemuse/hotchocolate.cfm
 
and put on some Christmas music:
 
http://www.pandora.com/?search=winter+wonderland&searchFilter=song
 
Here are a few more Holiday songs and movies:
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9KpNznVLlY
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfGhsuvF0Q4
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErrzjGCi3gY
 
http://www.hulu.com/watch/4862/miracle-on-34th-street-christmas-faith
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYexxEAl8Io
 
Or go to  www.hulu.com, where you can watch a few full-length movies and t.v. shows for free.
 
When you’re done with that, try saving Santa from the clutches of the evil Dr. Zass:
 
http://www.miniclip.com/games/en/christmas.php
 
Or just design your own videos with some fun-to-use software courtesy of the late, great Randy Pausch and Carnegie Mellon University:
 
http://download.srv.cs.cmu.edu/~pausch/
www.alice.org
 
 
Didn’t get the Iphone you wanted for Christmas? With this site, you can pretend you did. Scroll through a 3d videowall of images with a swoosh of your mouse with this free search download.
 
www.cooliris.com
 
Last but not least, here are a few presents…….
 
Your first gift is a selection of full-length Christmas stories, including Charles Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol.”
 
http://www.ucalgary.ca/~dKbrown/christmas.html
 
And your second  gift is an invitation to rediscover your local library—online.
Now, before you Luddites out there insist that you will never read a book unless you can feel the paper in your hands, consider this: the invitation comes with 20 new books every 2 to 3 weeks, including audiobooks, and you can browse through and check them out at midnight in your p.j.’s. No kidding. That’s pretty good, isn’t it?
And if you can’t live without that old book smell, here’s a scratch and sniff sticker that might help!🙂

 More later on ebooks in cyberspace, but go ahead and get started checking out library books at www.overdrive.com 
Check out whether your local Library is connected:
Just one more thing….

 

What has all this got to do with Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen? Well, his Flipstart, the mini-pc that his company invented, has been my passport to the wired world during the last several months. It is a fantastic E-reader, among other things, and because of it I have been able to read more during the last 8 months than I have in the last 8 years. It’s the best gift I’ve had all year.
 
Thanks, Paul, and Merry Christmas!!! I’m so glad you’re feeling better, dude!!!🙂
 
And Merry Christmas everyone!!!! Hope you’ve enjoyed the online journey!!!
 
 
——————————————————————
Other Christmas Links:
David Letterman’s Top 10 Lists—Christmas
http://www.allthingschristmas.com/party/letterman-topten.php
Top 50 Christmas Sites
http://www.techdigest.tv/2006/12/top_50_christma.html
All Things Christmas
http://www.allthingschristmas.com/stories.html
Grinch Online Coloring Book
http://www.seussville.com/grinch/coloring.swf
More Christmas Stories
http://holidays.kaboose.com/christmas/stories/xmas-stories.html
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 He’s been touted as the “Pharaoh of the Pacific Northwest” for his renovation of South Lake Union in Seattle, and listed among Time Magazine’s Most Influential for two years running. He owns 3 major league sports teams, and has left big footprints in several industries, including computers, medicine and space travel. And yet Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen has been described as a down-to-earth, regular guy—“the nicest billionaire you’ll ever meet.”

 

But just in case you never do meet him, you can still see that “Regular Guy” side of Allen via a few videos that have been floating around the Internet lately.

 

Check it out:

1) Shaq Attack:

Basketball phenom Shaquille O’Neal recovers gracefully from a tumble into the stands by shaking the hand of Trail Blazers owner, Paul Allen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKvm63hfFo8

 

2) High Five:

A Seahawks win has owner Paul Allen and fans in a very good mood. Check out this video of Allen high-fiving Seattle Seahawks fans as he walks off the field.
 
http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/thebigblog/archives/128891.asp

 

3) Twice Bitten:

Here Paul Allen is a good sport as he is attacked by a “vampire” while chatting with a comely news reporter about Gwen Stefani and technology.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1807044/stylela_paul_allen/

 

4) Cannes Hello:

Here is a video of Allen in Cannes, France, coming ashore from a trip aboard one of his megayachts, Tatoosh. His lovely home in St. Jean Cap-Ferrat, called Villa Maryland,  was a hangout for Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt during the 61st Cannes Film Festival last summer.

http://x17video.com/celebrity_video/brad_pitt/paul_allens_luxury_yacht.php

 

5) Blazers Workout:

Here is Paul Allen again after a Blazers workout, chatting about chatting with some dynamic new potential players from France — in French, no less.

http://videos.oregonlive.com/oregonlive/2008/06/paul_allen_on_tuesdays_workout.html

 

6) Blazers Press Conference:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur38bh1Ze4A

And here he is again talking about his favorite basketball team.

 

 

 7) Beard or No Beard?

 Here is Paul Allen joking around with Bill Gates as the famous photo from 1978 is retaken 30 years later: (2:30 minutes into the program):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyyYvdswn9Y

 

(From BBC’s “The Money Programme: Bill Gates: How a Geek Changed the World.” (Part 2)

 

8 ) A Computer on Every Desk:

 

And here he is talking about the realization of the dream that he and Bill Gates had of putting a computer in every home and on every desk:
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOuaT9r-YVk

 

9) Best Computer History Video of All Time:

If you haven’t seen Robert Cringley’s “Triumph of the Nerds,” in which many of the pioneers of the computer industry, including Paul Allen, were featured, you’ve got to check it out. Here is one place where you can find it :

 http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5816243901626409784&vt=lf&hl=en

 

10) Jamming with Friends:

Finally, here are a few of my favorites—-Paul Allen performing in concert through the years, just being a regular guy, having a good time and playing some pretty decent guitar rifts besides!

 

Here he is hamming it up with his band:

http://2008.thecableshow.com/Popups/ContentPopup.aspx?ID=427

 

And here is a bearded version of Paul Allen in 1995, having a great time performing with some good friends:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7736241993066088463&q=%22paul+allen%22&ei=rC0ZSI9SjqyuA9D3-OoG&hl=en
 

So maybe this post isn’t “Evri”-thing you wanted to know about Paul Allen—

in fact, you can find that here:

http://www.evri.com/person/paul-allen-0x49a77.html

 

But it’s still fun to see Allen in candid mode. :-)_________________________________________________________________________________

BTW—I know I’ve been away for awhile.

I’ve been a little sidetracked lately, doing some serious cyberspace exploration with my mini-pc, a Flipstart, and I’ve been having just too much fun with it to stop by.   But I’ll be back soon, I promise, with more six degrees connections, and a list of cool sites and other things I’ve discovered lately along the way.

Stay tuned…..

SPACESHIPS AND OTHER IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS

 

“…All my life I’ve wanted to see the day when men would conquer space and explore the planets—and I wanted to take part in it. I don’t have to tell you how that feels…”

From Robert Heinlein’s “Rocketship Galileo” p.23

 

 

Escaping from earth will not always be automatically expensive; contrary to the impression created by a Saturn launch, the energy needed to reach space is remarkably small…..Commercial space flight is now beginning to be technologically feasible and will soon become economically viable.”

Sir Arthur C. Clarke

From the Foreword to Dan Linehan’s “SpaceShipOne: An Illustrated History”

 

 

“Tourism is the first market for the new spaceflight industry, as thousands of people with the dream to see the earth from space for themselves sign up for rides on suborbital spaceships, which will become increasingly affordable.”

From the book “Rocketeers” by Michael Belfiore

 

 

Space travel was exciting to any kid growing up in the late 50’s and early 60’s, and Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen was no exception. Like millions of American kids, Allen followed the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions, and recalled the excitement he felt when the television cart was wheeled into his classroom so that he and fellow students could view the historic events on a black and white TV. Science fiction books fascinated him, like Robert Heinlein’s “Rocketship Galileo” which told the story of a group of kids who built their own spaceship; and a visit to the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair offered a simulated rocket journey into space in the world’s first “Spacearium.” 

As a kid, Allen built dozens of model rockets and even tried his hand at building a homemade rocket of his own out of an old lawn chair (it melted:-).  And he was awed by science fiction stories that made the big screen, among them 2001: A Space Odyssey, which he saw at Seattle’s local Cinerama theater.

 

So when brilliant inventor Burt Rutan introduced the idea of a low cost suborbital spacecraft, Paul Allen was very, very interested.

 

The relationship between the billionaire and the inventor began with a different business venture, but by the Spring of 2000, when Burt Rutan felt that his idea was ready for funding, he asked for a meeting with Paul Allen and told him about the spaceship he was designing. Allen responded with a handshake and an enthusiastic—“Let’s do it.”

 

 

“”I always had in the back of my mind, would I ever have the opportunity to do something in a space-related initiative? Allen recalled. “And so when the SpaceShipOne opportunity came up, I was very excited to pursue it.”

From Dan Linehan’s “SpaceShipOne: An Illustrated History”(p. 19)

 

 

And the rest is history. The Allen-funded SpaceShipOne soared into space, and on October 4th, 2004, it became the first privately funded spaceship to make it into suborbital space twice in two weeks with an equivalent weight of 3 people, thereby winning the Ansari X-prize. It also thereby effectively jumpstarted the commercial space travel industry, something which had previously been thought so impossible that it had a “giggle factor.”

 

On that October 4th date, back in mission control, as SpaceShipOne was still floating in space, Paul Allen shook another hand—the hand of billionaire Richard Branson—who purchased the rights to Allen’s spaceship development program for his own commercial “spaceline,” Virgin Galactic.  The handshake symbolized the next great step in the commercial space travel industry—as “Rocketeers” author Michael Belfiore commented, “That moment marked the end of the beginning of the commercial space age.”

 

And on July 28, 2008, just a couple of weeks ago, the reality of private space travel—of ordinary people becoming astronauts and sailing off into space—just got closer with the unveiling of Virgin Galactic’s mothership, Eve, otherwise known as WhiteKnightTwo.  The WhiteKnightTwo, a beautifully designed carrier aircraft, will be launching rocket SpaceShipTwo and thousands of private astronauts into suborbital space in the near future.

 

In fact, if you have a couple hundred thousand dollars (or A LOT of Virgin Atlantic frequent flier miles)*, and a dream to be an astronaut, you can sign up to be a passenger on a Virgin Galactic spaceflight right now:

 

See…

 

http://www.galacticjourneys.com/?gclid=CKPJ5qi6gpUCFQWxsgodxjGWrQ

 

OR

 

http://www.virgingalactic.com/flash.html?language=english

and for “Virgin Atlantic Frequent Fliers”*

http://promomagazine.com/incentives/virgin_atlantic_miles_011106/index.html

 

Apparently, a large number of people have already signed up.

 

See..

 

http://www.space.com/news/070703_virgingalactic_sales.html

 

 

 

It’s all pretty exciting when you think about it, and it had me wondering what space travel might look like, say, 50 years from now.  So just for fun, I thought I’d write a story about an astronaut from the year 2058, who is also, since spaceships are so common at that time, basically just an ordinary businessman on his way home from work.

 

Just one more thought…..in case you hadn’t guessed, this story is NOT real. And one more thing—if you see Microsoft Co-founder,  Paul Allen’s name (and related stuff) pop up in the story, remember that this IS the Six Degrees of Paul Allen site……..🙂

 

 

************************************************************** 

 

 

Businessman Bo Nunez stepped inside the gleaming spaceship and trudged wearily down the narrow aisle leading to the first class section of the 8 pm Virgin Galactic Transport Shuttle. It had been a long day.

 

He looked forward to getting home. Although the commute to his condo on the Rutan Community Moon Colony was a long one—roughly an hour’s journey—he did not regret the purchase of his new dream home there last year in 2057.  The price was admittedly astronomical, but it was a nice little community—the amenities were unparalleled, and the views—well, the views were literally out of this world.

 

He sank down into his plush leather seat, buckled his seat belt and settled in for the ride home. Donning headphones, he began to listen to a song he designed last night on his computer with the help of the latest Drumcore software. He had become a pro at mixing tracks—and by blending a little U2, Blues and drum solos from his favorite artists, he had come up with a pretty decent song. In fact, the recording would have been perfect were it not for the vocalist. He chuckled as he heard his own voice. “OK, so I guess I won’t quit my day job,” he laughed.

 

He pulled his Kiha* out of his shirt pocket and gently set it down on the pull-down table in front of him. Immediately the surface of the table began to shimmer and ripple as if it were made of water. Multicolored tropical fish appeared to swim deep into the surface of the table and across the screen in 3D, as the scene reflected the underwater beauty of Bo’s favorite dive spot in Palau. This was clearly his favorite screen saver, this underwater video that Bo took last summer, and it always put him in a good mood after a hard day’s work.

 

“Hello, Bo” said a soft, pleasant voice coming from the table. “Where do you want to go today?”

 

“To the moon, Alice!” he thought, remembering the ancient Jackie Gleason reruns that were so popular in the 2040’s. But instead he smiled and said:

 

“How about checking today’s headlines?”

 

Immediately the surface of the table changed to reveal the top stories and photos of the day. One headline in particular caught his eye:

 

“The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Changes Its Name.”

AP Seattle, Washington

 

“The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has announced that it is changing its name and its focus due to the recent development of the Cancer/HIV vaccine.  Since the vaccine was discovered a few years ago, these diseases have been effectively made obsolete in the civilized world.

 

The newly renamed Fred Hutchinson Research Center will now merge with neighboring charitable organizations; The Allen Institute for Brain Science, founded by Microsoft Co-founder, Paul Allen and the Gates Foundation, founded by Microsoft’s Bill Gates and his wife Melinda, to refocus its efforts and collaborate its resources in order to bring the vaccine, along with other recent Allen Institute cures for MS, MD and Alzheimer’s Disease, and the latest spinal cord regeneration treatment, to underdeveloped countries.

 

“We are extremely pleased and honored to be a part of this wonderful project,” stated Jo Allen Patton, chairman of the Allen Family Foundation. “We are grateful to the remarkable men and women who have developed breakthrough medicines that are now capable of defeating these devastating diseases, and we hope to continue to provide the funding necessary to bring these cures to every person who needs them in every corner of the world.”

 

Nunez paused for a moment to absorb the information. “Another scientific breakthrough from the Allen District of Seattle! What a place it must be!

 

“And Paul Allen—I’ve heard of that guy,” he thought. “I wonder what he’s doing now?”

                   

Curious, Nunez did an EVRI  search and discovered that at 105 years old the Microsoft Co-founder had just cut his 4th best-selling rock album.

 

“So he finally broke down and released another set of songs,” Nunez thought. He remembered what terrific hits the first three albums had become nearly 20 years ago, but he had heard that Allen hesitated to issue another album.  It was important to him that people remembered him for more than just his music.

 

Right under that headline was an article about Allen and Gates:

 

“Dynamic Duo Strikes Again

 

People Weekly

 

‘Holy smokes, Batman!’  The Dynamic Duo is at it again, battling the forces of evil.

 

No, we’re not talking about ancient comic book superheroes, but about an unbeatable team of philanthropists named Paul Allen and Bill Gates. Not quite a century ago, when the pair was barely out of their teens, they wrote a language that changed the world, and founded a company that is still one of the most successful organizations in the history of business.

 

And now they’ve joined forces again to take on a new villain—-disease.

 

Bill Gates and his wife Melinda have been in the disease vanquishing business since the turn of the century. Through their efforts with the Gates Foundation, the disease Malaria, a horrible scourge that plagued millions of people many years ago has long gone the way of Microsoft’s early competitors. But Gates has begun to tackle other dark forces and has taken on a new partner to do it—his old Microsoft partner, Paul Allen.

 

Allen has been on a disease fighting mission of his own for many years. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, a charitable organization that he founded in 2003, has made major breakthroughs recently in combating a number of debilitating illnesses that have plagued the world. The Allen Institute has historically ventured into a number of research projects such as the brain map and spinal cord map, and has published its findings for free, assisting researchers to find cures for diseases in their particular fields. Recognizing that this kind of information-sharing leads to scientific breakthroughs that benefit everyone, other researchers have followed suit, and the speed of progress in fighting these infirmities has taken off like lightning in recent years, most recently leading to cures.

 

The Gates’ will now join The Allen Family Foundation and the recently renamed Fred Hutchinson Research Center in bringing these cures for a number of diseases, among them Alzheimer’s, MD, Multiple Sclerosis and Lou Gehrig’s disease, as well as the recently discovered Cancer/HIV Vaccine and Spinal Regeneration and Regrowth treatments, to countries that currently do not have access to this kind of medicine.

 

May their battle against disease take them to the ends of the earth and to the farthest reaches of space; or, in the words of another Superhero,

 

‘To Infinity and Beyond!’ “

 

——————————————————

 

This was great news. Bo remembered a friend of his from years ago, a good friend whom he’d lost…….”I wish those cures had been around earlier,” he thought to himself.

 

He was deep in thought when the seat belt light clicked off and nudged him out of his reverie. Bo looked up from the screen on the table in front of him and gazed out the window. What a view! He could never get used to how beautiful the earth looked from up here.

 

Some of the passengers had taken off their seat belts and were floating around the room, laughing and doing somersaults, and noisily calling each other over to the many windows of the spacecraft to check out the spectacular scenery. When the cabin was full, this was considered bad manners—-this bouncing around the room, sometimes bumping into people who just wanted to get home. But tonight, perhaps because of the late flight, the cabin was nearly empty, and there was plenty of room to move around.

 

As many times as he had made this trip, Bo could not resist feeling completely thrilled by this part of the ride. The feeling of weightlessness made him feel, well, even a little giddy, like a kid riding on a roller coaster for the first time.

 

But today for some reason, he was overwhelmed by the feeling.  Maybe it was the stress of the day or the good news he’d just read. Or maybe he had just taken it all for granted for too long. Whatever the reason, today he couldn’t resist taking off his seat belt and joining the floaters.  As he released the latch of his seat belt and floated away from the restraint, suddenly Bo Nunez forgot the seriousness of the day he had just had. He forgot his age, his business, his life back on earth. For this moment, none of those things mattered. He was 10 years old again—free—and if he wanted to jump off of his first class leather seat and bounce around the walls of this luxury craft in his business suit, he could care less how it looked to anyone else.

 

The seat belt sign came on again, much too soon it seemed, and he belted himself in once more for the lightening-fast ride home. He was breathless, elated from his venture climbing around the cabin and he felt a little like a school kid who had misbehaved in class and had gotten away with it.  By the time the Virgin Galactic Shuttle descended upon the Lunar Spaceport and touched down on the surface of the moon, Bo Nunez was in a very, very good mood.

 

——————————————————

 

Just for fun…so that means that none of this is real. But impossible? Maybe not …… J

 

 

———————————————

Check out these links…….

Dan Linehan’s SpaceShipOne: an Illustrated History: 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d.html/ref=ms_b_p_1_p1/102-4832936-3742544?ie=UTF8&a=076033188X

Michael Belfiore’s “Rocketeers”

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d.html/ref=ms_a_2_p1/102-4832936-3742544?ie=UTF8&a=0061149039

 

“Rocketship Galileo” Robert Heinlein

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_Ship_Galileo

Other References:

www.paulallen.com 

http://www.paulallen.com/Template2.aspx?contentId=49
Remarks upon winning the Robert J. Collier Trophy from Allen’s website

Other Links:

Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo Ready for Trips into Space::

 

http://www.virgingalactic.com/

 

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25849434/from/ET/

Upcoming conference on what’s next in the tourism industry:

http://www.asiatraveltips.com/news08/128-TourismCongress.shtml

 

Paul Allen’s SpaceShipOne:

 

http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/SS1_ALLEN_040620.html

http://www.desertturtle.com/

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn6487-spaceshipone-wins-x-prize-for-spaceflight.html

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/SpaceShipOne.html

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6167761/

 

Condos on the moon in 50 years?

 http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/07/24/2312706.htm?section=justin

 http://savannahnow.com//node/529223

(What about 15?)

 

Institutes mentioned as they are in 2008: 

The Allen Institute for Brain Science:

 

http://www.brain-map.org/

 

Allen Institute Spinal Cord Map:

 

http://www.healthnews.com/medical-updates/new-spinal-cord-map-charts-gene-mysteries-1470.html

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/mnr/alleninstitute/33951/

 

Allen Institute Brain Atlas:

 

http://mouse.brain-map.org/images/logo_AIBS.gif

 

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation:

 

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/default.htm

 

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center:

 

http://www.fhcrc.org/wrapper/img-header/tn_research_o.gif

————————————

 Other Stuff Mentioned:

 

 

 

EVRI:

 

www.EVRI.com

 

http://blog.evri.com/

 

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/art/spacer.gif

 

Drumcore:

 

http://www.submersiblemusic.com/NewsDetail.aspx?id=12

 

 

The Paul Allen Band:

 

http://2008.thecableshow.com/Popups/ContentPopup.aspx?ID=427

 

Kiha:

 

http://seattle.bizjournals.com/seattle/stories/2008/02/18/story4.html

 

*(BTW, I have no idea what they’re up to—just took a guess….:-)

 

Microsoft’s “Surface”

 

http://blogs.msdn.com/surface/archive/tags/Microsoft+Surface/default.aspx 

————————————

 

SpaceShipOne and SpaceShipTwo Videos and more:

—————————————————

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vnSihCwTEY

 Inside SpaceShipTwo

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z_cUOYwV3E

 From the Discovery Channel and Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions “Black Sky”   (Mike Melville)

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APvW1OELo-k

 SpaceShipTwo Demo

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkO040690Wk

SpaceShipOne winning the X-Prize (Brian Binnie)

 http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9615023/

 Space Travel future

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HffKW2Z0DPY

 Virgin Galactic SpacePort

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4h247PPOrY

 Virgin Galactic video narrated by Richard Branson

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBo8t0B5NhM

 Animation of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo from a year ago

 http://news.cnet.com/Private-industry-moves-to-take-over-space-race/2009-11397_3-6210833.html

 Private industry moves to take over space race

 http://www.universetoday.com/2008/01/23/virgin-galactic-unveils-spaceshiptwo/

Honeymoon in Space, Anyone?🙂 

http://honeymoons.about.com/od/flying/qt/VirginGalactic.htm

 

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